Solution Center

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Hard or Soft Water
Softeners
No-Salt Softeners
Reverse Osmosis
Drinking Water
Skin Problems
Water Waste
Softener Bans
Septic Tanks
Yellowish Water
Rusty Water
Greenish Stains on Plumbing
Cloudy Water
Fishy or Earthy Smell
Chlorine Smell
Bacteria

 

Hard or Soft Water

Q. What makes water hard or soft?
A.
A water's "hardness" or "softness" is due to mineral concentration, particularly calcium and magnesium. The lower the mineral concentration, the softer the water is. When you use soft water, you don't need to use as much dishwashing soap, laundry detergent, or other soaps. Many new dishwashers allow you to set the hardness of the water so that you do not need to use as much soap in comparison to places that have hard water. (Return to Top)


Softeners

Q. Why does soft water make my skin feel slippery or like I can't get the soap off?
A:
In hard water your pores are clogged with soap scum. When this scum in clogging your pores , your natural skin oils are not able to come out. Showering or washing in soft water cleans your pores out and releases your skin's natural oils. This causes the slippery, slick feeling. It is simply your pores unclogging and your natrual skin oils coming out.

Q: Do all softeners use salt?
A:
No, some can use potassium instead.

Q: Can I drink soft water?
A:
We recommend you don't drink soft water because a softener is not a purifier. It does not remove dead plant and animal materials, lead, mercury, nitrates, chromium, cadmium or even chlorine.

Q: Will the salt in the water hurt me if I drink it?
A:
No, it will usually not affect you unless you are on a very low sodium diet. (For more information see, "Can I drink the soft water?").

Q: Will I taste the salt in the water if I drink the soft water?
A:
No, under normal conditions you will not taste it, but it is recommended that you do not drink it. (See: Can I drink the soft water?).

Q: Where does the softener hook up?
A:
Usually in your basement, ultility room or even your garage. We have many different shapes and sizes to fit even the tightest of areas.

Q: Does it make noise?
A:
Sometimes it will, if it's doing a regeneration.

Q: How long does regeneration take?
A:
Generally speaking, it takes between 1/2 to 1 1/2 hours, but the time is different depending on the model. (Return to Top)


No-Salt Softeners

Q: Do no-salt softeners really work?
A:
There has never been a no-salt system we have tested that has removed or reduced the hardness in the water. Some no-salt conditioners have been shown to reduce calcium build up on pipes and in boilers. They do not, however, make for clean dishes, fixtures or soft skin. (Return to Top)


Reverse Osmosis

Q: Why is it necessary?
A:
Tap water may contain contaminants like lead, mercury, arsenic or nitrates. Softeners and carbon filters can't remove these contaminants.

Q: Does it take out the minerals from the water that we need or are good?
A:
We get our minerals from the food we eat, not the water we drink. If you want calcium in your water that your body can use you can add coral calcium - an organic mineral. Talk to your doctor for specific deficiencies in your body and how to remedy them. (Return to Top)


Drinking Water

Q: What is the best water to drink?
A:
Our position is that the best water is purified of all contaminants, pH buffering when requested, and is supplemented with any minerals not received in an ordinary diet.

Q: How well does my fridge filter work?
A:
The only way to be sure is to test the filter. Contact us for a test if you're interested. (Return to Top)


Skin Problems

Q: Why is my skin always so dry? Is this normal?
A:
If you have hard water the most common problem is your skin pores are packed with soap scum. The best way to fix that is to soften your water.

Q: Why does my skin itch after I shower?
A:
If you have a softener, you could be sensitive to the chlorine or some chemical aspect of the water. If you went to a dermatologist the first thing they might tell you to try is changing soaps. After you have changed your soap several times the only thing left to consider is the water.

Q: Can I be allergic to soft water, or my water softener?
A:
It's possible but doubtful. When you first install a water softener, it will remove the soap scum build up off your skin, which can act as a barrier for chemicals in the water. Some people notice itching after installing the water softener because of the increased dermal absorption for chemicals like chlorine and that is what the itchy reaction is from. You can add a whole house carbon filter to eliminate the itchiness. (Return to Top)


Water Waste

Q. I have heard these systems waste water. How efficient are these systems?
A.
All water using appliances discharge water. Because of our efficiencies we can save 20,000 gallons of water per year compared to conventional systems. (Return to Top)


Softener Bans

Q. I have heard water softeners are being banned, or could be banned.
A.
The banning of water softeners has only happened 3 times in 20 years. All bans grandfather in existing equipment, the law just states you can not install one. (Return to Top)


Septic Tanks

Q. Are water softeners safe for septic systems?
A.
Yes, the calcium and sodium discharge do nothing to effect your septic system. The things you want to avoid for septic tanks are bleach or other disinfectant household cleaners and lack of water. (Return to Top)


Yellowish Water

Q. In winter, we sometimes get yellowish-looking water from our taps that stains our bathroom and kitchen fixtures and our laundry. Why is this happening? Is it safe to use? How can we remove the stains?
A.
Water sometimes turns yellow from low levels of dissolved iron from old iron pipes in the water system. This mainly occurs in winter, when water usage is low, because the water sits in the pipes for a longer period of time. According to the federal Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), increased levels of iron that produce yellow water are not public health threats. Hardware stores have products to remove rust stains from clothing and household surfaces. (Return to Top)


Rusty Water

Q. From time to time I get rusty-looking water at home. Sometimes I can even see little specks of rust floating in the water. What is the cause of this, and what should I do when it happens?
A.
Red water sometimes occurs when there is an increase or change in water flow, largely caused by water main breaks, fire hydrant activations, and flow direction changes made by towns. These occurrences knock off small particles of rust and stir up sediments in the pipes. It is a temporary condition that usually clears up in a couple of hours. Your local water department should have information on the problem and how long it should last. If possible, refrain from using water -- for laundry, dishes, cooking and drinking -- until the condition clears up. (Return to Top)


Greenish Stains on Plumbing

Q. We're getting green stains on our bathtub. What causes this?
A.
Green stains on plumbing fixtures are a result of copper leaching from the plumbing in your house. The pH of the water can be adjusted to reduce this. (Return to Top)


Cloudy Water

Q. The hot and cold water from our kitchen sink sometimes comes out very cloudy. If we leave the water in the container, it then clears up quickly and the cloudiness disappears. Should we be using this water?
A.
Cloudy water, also known as white water, is caused by air bubbles. It usually happens when it is very cold outside and air gets mixed in with the water supply. It is completely harmless. The best thing to do is let it sit in an open container until the bubbles naturally disappear. (Return to Top)


Fishy or Earthy Smell

Q. In spring and fall, we sometimes notice a fishy or earthy taste and odor to our water. What causes this, and is it safe to drink?
A.
This is probably the result of algae growth in one of the water system's reservoirs, partially caused by the change of season. Different types of algae can cause your water to smell fishy, moldy or grassy. Refrigerating the water can help eliminate the odor. Adding a lemon slice will remove any bitter taste. (Return to Top)


Chlorine Smell

Q. In summer my water smells like chlorine. Why does this happen, and how can reduce the odor?
A.
Water suppliers disinfect water to protect against harmful bacteria that can enter into reservoirs. Ozone is used to kill any harmful bacteria. Ozone leaves no taste or odor improves the natural taste of the water. To protect the water as it travels through the pipes, a mild disinfectant called mono-chloramine is used. Occasionally people may find their water has the odor of chlorine. It usually doesn't last long, and is related to the normal adjustment of the mono-chlorine treatment. This is more likely in the summer when water is warmer. Chilling the water usually eliminates it. (Return to Top)


Bacteria

Q. What is done about bacteria in drinking water?
A.
Communities regularly take water samples, which are then analyzed in laboratories for bacteria counts. A particular type of bacteria that they test for -- coliform -- serves to indicate that harmful germs may also be present. If coliform are found in 5% or more of the samples collected in a month, the community is required by law to notify residents in their locale. In addition, when coliform are found in samples, the lab conducts additional testing to determine if a specific type, E. coli, is present. If E.coli is present, this is considered evidence of a critical public health concern. Usually the solution in this case is to boil the water until the problem is solved. (Return to Top)